History of art, history homework help

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I have a list of images and some information about them ( like I have this information about :

“Herb Lubalin, proposed magazine logo for Families, late 1960”)

what I need you to find out the images and the information about them I mean the rest of the the information and I need the images also!

Here is the list…

Revised image list • FINAL SPR16

Images you must be able to identify and give the exact year (or at least the decade), the name, a brief
description of it, and why it matters to the history of graphic design.

  • Kitagawa Utamaro, portrait of a courtesan, late 1700s

  • Aubrey Beardsley, illustrations from Oscar Wilde’s Salome, 1894

  • Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, poster La Goulue au Moulin Rouge, 1891

  • Alphonse Mucha, poster for Job cigarette papers, 1898

  • Peter Behrens, The Kiss, 1898

  • Gustav Klimt, poster for first Vienna Secession exhibition, 1898

  • Pablo Picasso, Guernica, 1937

  • Ardengo Soffici, “Bifszf + 18 Simultaneite Chimismi Iirici”, 1915

  • Hannah Hoch, Da-dandy, 1919

  • Marcel Duchamp, The Fountain, 1917

  • The Beggarstaffs, poster for Kassama Corn Flour, 1894

  • James Montgomery Flagg, poster for military recruiting, 1917

  • A.M. Cassandre, L’intransigeant, 1925

  • A.M. Cassandre, poster for North Star Paris-to-Amsterdam night train, 1927

  • El Lissitzky, Beat the Whites with the Red Wedge, 1919

  • El Lissitzky, book cover for The Isms of Art, 1924

  • Piet Mondrian, Composition with Red, Yellow, and Blue, 1922

  • Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, title page Staatliches Bauhaus in Weimer, 1919-1923, 1923

  • Joost Schmidt, Bauhaus Exhibition Poster, 1923

  • Herbert Bayer, poster for Kandinsky’s Exhibition and 60th Birthday, 1926

  • Jan Tschichold, cinema poster for Die Hose (The Trousers), 1927

  • Herbert Matter, Swiss tourism poster, 1934

  • Lester Beall, posters for Rural Electrification Administration, c. 1937

  • J. Howard Miller, “We Can Do It!” poster, 1942

  • Herbert Bayer, CCA “Great Ideas” advertisements, 1954 (left), 1960 (right)

  • Herbert Matter, brochure covers introducing Knoll chair, 1956

  • Armin Hoffman, logotype for the Basel Civic Theater, 1954

  • Armin Hoffman, poster for the Basel Civic Theater production of Giselle, 1959

  • Joseph Müller-Brockmann, Zurich Town Hall Poster, Beethoven (1 of series), 1955

  • Armin Hofmann, Die Gute Form (Good Form), 1958

  • Paul Rand, AIGA poster, 1968 (this is the green poster partially covering the red “AIGA”)

  • Paul and Ann Rand, Sparkle and Spin: A Book About Words cover, 1957

  • Paul Rand, Eye Bee M poster for IBM, 1981

  • Alvin Lustig, cover for Arthur Rimbaud’s A Season in Hell, 1945

  • Saul Bass, logo and/or film titles for The Man with the Golden Arm, 1955

  • Herb Lubalin, proposed magazine logo for Mother, late 1960s

2

  • Herb Lubalin, proposed magazine logo for Families, late 1960s

  • George Lois (designer) and Carl Fischer (photographer), Esquire cover, April 1968

  • George Lois (designer) and Carl Fischer (photographer), Esquire cover, May 1969

  • George Lois (designer) and Carl Fischer (photographer), Esquire cover, May 1968

  • Waldemar Swierzy, Jimi Hendrix poster, 1974

  • Seymour Chwast, “End Bad Breath”, 1968

  • Milton Glaser, “I Love NY”, 1975-7

  • Milton Glaser, Bob Dylan poster, 1967

  • Wes Wilson, featuring Grateful Dead, Otis Rush Chicago Blues Band, The Canned Heat Blues

    Band, 1967

  • Wim Crouwel, Leger Poster, 1957

  • Jamie Reid, Sex Pistols: God Save the Queen, UK, 1977

  • Neville Brody, The Face (progressive breakdown of magazine’s contents page logo), UK, 1984

  • April Greiman, Design Quarterly #133 Magazine Poster, USA, 1986

  • Students of Cranbrook Academy of Art, Output, USA, 1992

  • Wolfgang Weingart, Kunstkredit exhibition Poster, 1977

  • April Greiman and Jayme Odgers, WET magazine cover, 1979

  • Barney Bubbles, The Ian Drury Songbook, 1979

  • Malcolm Garrett and Linder Sterling, Buzzcocks “Orgasm Addict” album cover, 1977

  • Allen Hori, Typography as Discourse, 1989

  • Paula Scher, The Diva is Dismissed for Public Theater, 1994

  • Paula Scher, Bring in ‘Da Noise Bring in ‘Da Funk, 1995

  • Art Chantry, The Night Gallery performance art poster, Center on Contemporary Art, 1991

  • Benjamin Savignac, DEdiCate magazine cover, 2003

  • David Carson, Bryan Ferry Ray Gun article, 1994 (set in Dingbats)

  • David Carson, Ray Gun magazine covers, (1992-2000)

  • Chip Kidd, Pastorilia book cover, 2000

  • Stefan Sagmeister, Lou Reed Set the Twilight Reeling poster for album cover, 1996

  • Stefan Sagmeister, AIGA and Cranbrook Academy of Art poster, 1999 (carved into flesh)

  • Stefan Sagmeister (Tom Schierlitz, photography), poster for AIGA New York Chapter, 1996

    (tongues)

  • Shepard Fairey, HOPE Obama, Campaign Poster, USA, 2008

  • Photo of Obama taken by Manny Garcia for AP in 2008

Addition information

Images for the Final will cover something in regards to at least one the following:

  1. 1)  A comparison between European and American modernist graphic design, both in its theory and
    its application/purpose.

    1. See the slides that listed these and be sure you understand them so that you can use them
      to defend your points. Don’t just list them back to me.

    2. Be specific in the change from social statements to commercialism and why the designs
      were used for these purposes. Know the artists and know their audiences.

    3. Identify the stylistic differences.

    4. Explain specifically how an artist/art movement from Europe affected the designs of an

      American artist/art movement. Know specifics of who affected whom.

    5. Know the Bauhaus and why it was so important.

    6. Understand why America took late to Modernism in general.

  2. 2)  Identification and explanation of the International Typographic (or Swiss) Style and earlier
    movements from Europe.

    1. Echoes of the above points (#1), though examples for #1 European influence will be from
      early 20th century. International Typographic Style will deal more with mid-20th century.
      America being influenced in intermingled.

    2. Know the typeface Helvetica and its impact.

    3. Understand the shifts in ideology for the purpose of a designer in society, specifically

      how that differs in American capitalism.

  3. 3)  Understand the New Advertising in America, which we covered specifically with mention to
    Paul Rand and Doyle Dayne Bernbach.

    a. Briefly state what was being done before this way of selling.b. Understand the soft sell, talking with consumers instead of at them.c. Identify visual and verbal treatment to the ad campaigns and why the very visual and

    verbal was part of the strategyd. Reference Big Idea thinkinge. Mention to advertising’s relation to design and how when they’re used together, great

    commercial work can be created.

  4. 4)  Comparison between 1960s-70s poster style and earlier design. This could be a comparison with
    traditional art methods (art nouveau or cubism, for example).

    1. PushPin and/or psychedelic posters could be options for this question. Both being about
      a break from clean modernism and using a strong illustrative style

    2. The reason why this illustrative style occurred and its relevance to the countercultural
      movements in America at that time

    3. How these styles, specifically psychedelic posters, borrowed from earlier traditional art
      movements like art nouveau, cubism, etc.

  5. 5)  A comparison of styles and ideologies between Postmodernism and Dada. Be able to define the
    specifics of postmodernism (this in itself is worth pages of explanation).

    a. How some do not even agree that postmodern is a style, but a collection of trends.b. The overall causes of pluralism in postmodern society and its symptoms, specifically how

    these systems are expressed in graphic design styles.
    c. Deconstruction, appropriation, technology: what and why these are.
    d. “Depoliticized” grunge vs. political purposes of Dada.
    e. Ideological differences between Postmodernists and Dadaists.
    f. Reception of each of these pieces of art to the mainstream and/or specific segments

    of the population.

1

6) A comparison of styles and ideologies between graphic design Modernism and Postmodernism,
concentrating on the information we covered in this class. Be able to define the specifics of
postmodernism (this in itself is worth pages of explanation).

a. How some do not even agree that postmodern is a style, but a collection of trends.
b. The overall causes of pluralism in postmodern society vs. the modernist goal of a

universal truth.
c. Deconstruction, appropriation, technology: what and why these are.
d. Ideological differences between Postmodernists and Modernists.
e. The role of the designer in society for Modernism vs. Postmodernism.
f. Reception of each of these pieces of art to the mainstream and/or specific segments

of the population.

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