You are a seasoned, Democratic political operative, with extensive experience managing state and local campaigns in Rhode Island. You are approached by wealthy, female entrepreneur with no political e

STUCK with your assignment? When is it due? Hire our professional essay experts who are available online 24/7 for an essay paper written to a high standard at a reasonable price.


Order a Similar Paper Order a Different Paper

You are a seasoned, Democratic political operative, with extensive experience managing state and local campaigns in Rhode Island.

You are approached by wealthy, female entrepreneur with no political experience, who expresses an interest in running for Governor of Rhode Island in 2022. She contracts you to draft a campaign strategy memo laying out her path to victory.

Draft a campaign memo that addresses all of the following:

Rhode Island’s election rules and procedures, including but not limited to eligibility requirements for candidates, ballot access requirements, election dates and timetables, voting qualifications and procedures, etc.;

campaign fundraising, including but not limited to how much a successful Democratic gubernatorial campaign will have to raise and spend, a donor taxonomy, an explanation of Rhode Island’s public matching funds’ program, and campaign spending rules;

Rhode Island’s Democratic party “ecosystem” and how its various components may assist your campaign;

potential interest groups that may be enlisted for support and how they might do so;

media strategy, including statewide and local media outlets and their potential impacts on voters; and

estimate of voter turnout and voter targeting, including key cities and towns, etc.

Your Campaign Strategy Memo should be composed a Word document or PDF, be eight (8) to ten (10) pages in length, typed in size 12 Times New Roman fonts, and double-spaced.

links and sources:

https://ballotpedia.org/Primary_elections_in_Rhode_Island

https://www.270towin.com/2020-democratic-nomination/rhode-island-primary

https://elections.ri.gov/finance/publicinfo/

https://elections.ri.gov/finance/manuals/

https://riaclu.org/issues/voting-rights

https://elections.ri.gov/

https://vote.sos.ri.gov/

You are a seasoned, Democratic political operative, with extensive experience managing state and local campaigns in Rhode Island. You are approached by wealthy, female entrepreneur with no political e
By Paul E dward Parker Journal Staff W riter Posted Apr 20, 2016 at 10:29 PM Updated Apr 20, 2016 at 10:29 PM Votes don’t always add up to delegates, and while the parties’ rules vary, Republicans and Democrats share a confusing complexity PROVIDENCE, R.I. — Y ou walk into the voting booth on Tuesday, mark a ballot for Ted or John or Donald or Bernie or Hillary, and may the best man — who might be a woman — win. Nothing could be simpler, right? Dream on! In Rhode Island, and all across America, the presidential primary system was designed to be anything but simple. From the ballots to the way votes are counted to how delegates are allocated to each candidate, complexity abounds. The rules aren’t even the same for the Republicans and the Democrats. In general, though, the ballot for each party will contain the names of four candidates, plus the names of a slew of delegate candidates, broken down by the presidential candidate with whom they are aligned. Voters select the name of a presidential candidate in the first part of the ballot, plus one or more delegates for the candidate they marked in the first part. The vote for presidential candidates will determine how many delegates each candidate gets. The votes for delegate candidates will determine which specific delegates go to the national convention. Why four presidential candidates on each ballot? Th e R .I . P re sid en tia l P rim ary : A h ea d – sc ra tc h in g d ele g ate g am e For the Democrats, there are two major candidates, Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton, plus two minor candidates. For the Republicans, there are the candidates still in the race — Donald Trump, Ted Cruz and John Kasich — plus one who has already dropped out, Marco Rubio. Ballots for each party also include a line where voters can select delegates who are not committed to a candidate and a line for write-ins. So, how does delegate selection work? It varies by party: Democrats Rhode Island Democrats will send 33 delegates to their national convention in Philadelphia in July. They’ll also send two alternates, which we’ll overlook for the sake of simplicity. Only 15 of those 33 delegates will be chosen by the voters in Tuesday’s primary. Another nine will be chosen by the state Democratic Party at its state convention in June. The final nine are superdelegates, party officials and officeholders who get to go to Philadelphia by virtue of the offices they hold: four members of the Democratic National Committee from Rhode Island, the two U.S. senators, the two U.S. representatives and the governor. That makes it theoretically possible for a Democratic candidate to get 100 percent of the votes Tuesday, but lose Rhode Island 18 delegates to 15. The 15 chosen Tuesday are not selected statewide, but by Congressional District. District 1, represented in Congress by David N. Cicilline, will choose eight delegates, and District 2, represented by Jim Langevin, will choose seven. The numbers are based on population and turnout in past elections. Within each district, delegates will be awarded in proportion to the votes for each candidate. After selecting a presidential candidate, voters will be asked to choose delegate candidates; eight in District 1 and seven in District 2. Republicans Rhode Island Republicans have an arguably simpler system, but not by a whole lot. Rhode Island will send 19 delegates to the Republican National Convention in Cleveland in July. Rhode Island Republicans will also have 16 alternates. Of the 19 delegates, 16 will be chosen by voters on Tuesday. The three others are members of the Republican National Committee from Rhode Island. Unlike the Democrats, Republicans will use a hybrid system in selecting the 16 elected delegates. Ten will be chosen statewide, divided in proportion to the votes each candidate receives. Three will be chosen in Congressional District 1 and three in District 2, again divided in proportion to the votes each candidate receives in the district. So while the Republican system is simpler, its ballot is more complicated. In addition to choosing a presidential candidate, Republican voters will be asked to select two sets of delegate candidates: 10 statewide candidates and three within their Congressional District. [email protected] (401) 277-7360 On Twitter: @projopaul
You are a seasoned, Democratic political operative, with extensive experience managing state and local campaigns in Rhode Island. You are approached by wealthy, female entrepreneur with no political e
A guide for candidates [email protected] 401.222.2340 www.sos.ri.gov @RISecState Nellie M. Gorbea Secretary of State This guide was produced by the Rhode Island Department of State 2016 Rhode Island How to Run for Office Guide Dear Potential Candidate: I applaud your interest in serving the public as an elected official. As your Secretary of State, I am working hard to engage and empower all Rhode Islanders and ensure that our elections are fair, fast, and accurate. This digital guide contains all of the information you will need to run for office in the state’s September primary and November’s general election including: • Filing deadlines; • Campaign finance regulations, as governed by the state Board of Elections; • Contact information for your local elections officials. We are happy to provide a hard copy of the guide upon request. If you need additional information, please contact our Elections Division at 401-222-2340, TTY 711 or [email protected] Government can and must be effective, transparent and accountable to the people it serves in order to succeed. That can only happen when we all participate. I look forward to seeing you at the polls in 2016. Sincerely, Nellie M. Gorbea Secretary of State Table of Contents Important Candidate Deadlines ………………………………………………….. 4 Eligibility to Run for Office ………………………………………………………….. 5 Disaffiliation ……………………………………………………………… …………….. 6 Filing a Declaration of Candidacy ………………………………………………. 7 Endorsements ……………………………………………………………… …………. 9 Nomination Papers ……………………………………………………………… ….. 11 Withdrawal of Candidacy ……………………………………………………….. 13 Ballot Arrangement – Primary ………………………………………………….. 14 Ballot Arrangement – General Election ……………………………………….. 15 Election Day Activities ……………………………………………………………… 16 Campaign Finance ……………………………………………………………… ….. 16 2016 Campaign Finance Calendar ……………………………………………. 17 Ethics Commission Filing …………………………………………………………. 19 Contact Information: Local Boards of Canvassers …………………………………………………….. 20 State Elections and Political Party Offices ………………………………….. 21 United States Postal Service (USPS) ………………………………………. 21 Additional Information: Department of State’s Website …………………………………………………. 21 Rhode Island How to Run for Office Guide – 2016 | 4 NOTE: The determinations in this booklet are a matter of interpretation and are intended solely as a guide. They do not constitute official interpretation of state law. All statutory references are to Title 17 of the General Laws, 1956, as amended, as of December 31, 2015. Important Candidate Deadlines March 29, 30, or 31 Deadline for candidates to disaffiliate from their political party to run as a candidate from another party. Deadline depends on the date a candidate files Declaration of Candidacy. May 27 Deadline for candidates to register to vote to be able to run for office. June 27, 28, or 29 Deadline for candidates to file Declarations of Candidacy. June 30 Deadline for endorsements to be filed for local and state candidates. July 1 Deadline for endorsements to be filed for federal candidates. July 6 Date that candidates may pick up their nomination papers. July 15 Date that all candidates (except independent presidential electors) mu st submit nomination papers to local boards of canvassers. July 18 Deadline for candidates for local office to file withdrawals of candidacy. July 22 Deadline for candidates for federal or state office to file withdrawals of candidacy. July 22 Ballot placement lottery for primary and general election. September 9 Date that presidential electors for independent presidential candidates must submit nomination papers to local boards of canvassers. September 13 PARTY PRIMARIES September 16 Deadline for presidential electors for independent presidential candidat es to file withdrawals of candidacy. September 16 Ballot placement lottery for independent presidential candidates. November 8 GENERAL ELECTION Secretary of State Nellie M. Gorbea | 5 Eligibility to Run for Office You must be a registered voter in Rhode Island (except President and Vice-President) and live within the district for the office you seek. See chart below for other requirements. Office Age State Residence U.S. Citizen Years in Term # of Terms President 35 14 years in U.S. yes, natural born 4 2 Vice President 35 14 years in U.S. yes, natural born 4 no limit Presidential Elector 18 30 days yes n/a no limit * U.S. Senator 30 yes 9 years 6 no limit U.S. Representative 25 yes 7 years 2 no limit State Senator 18 30 days yes 2 no limit State Representative 18 30 days yes 2 no limit Local Offices 18 30 days in district yes Check with Local Board of Canvassers * Not on the 2016 ballot. Party Eligibility Affiliated candidates: If you plan on running as a party candidate, you must be a member of tha t particular party (Democrat, Moderate or Republican) or unaffiliated at the time of filing your Declaration of Candidacy. Independent/unaffiliated candidates: You are eligible to file a Declaration of Candidacy as an independent/unaffiliated candidate if, at the time of filing the Declaration of Candidacy, you are qualified to vote in the election within the district for the office which you seek. The following chart may help you understand your options: You are eligible to run as a: If you are registered as a: Democrat Moderate Republican Independent Democrat Moderate Republican Independent Ye s No* No* Ye s No* Ye s No* Ye s No* No* Ye s Ye s Ye s Ye s Ye s Ye s NOTE: In the preceding chart, “Independent” refers to “unaffiliated”. ! Deadline to register to vote to run for office in 2016, no later than Friday, May 27th. ! * If you belong to one party and want to run as a candidate for another party, you must change your party at least 90 days prior to the date you will file your Declaration of Candidacy. You must file a disaffiliation no later than March 31st. Rhode Island How to Run for Office Guide – 2016 | 6 Disaffiliation What is disaffiliation? When you no longer wish to be a member of a particular political party, you must sign a form to “disaffiliate” from that party. Forms are available at the local boards of canvassers. Do I have to disaffiliate? If you want to run as a candidate for a party other than the one to whic h you belong, the following chart may help you understand your filing options: Are you required to disaffiliate if you wish to run as a: If you are registered as a: Democrat Moderate Republican Independent Democrat Moderate Republican Independent No Ye s Ye s No* Ye s No Ye s No* Ye s Ye s No No* No* No* No* No * By declaring to be a candidate in a primary you will then become a mem ber of that party. NOTE: In the preceding chart, “Independent” refers to “unaffiliated”. When is the deadline to disaffiliate? If you file your Declaration of Candidacy on: You must file your disaffiliation, if necessary, no later than: June 27th June 28th June 29th March 29th March 30th March 31st Where can I disaffiliate? You must disaffiliate with the local Board of Canvassers in the city or town where you are registered to vote. You can also file your disaffiliation by completing a new voter registration form, keeping in mind that a mailed registration form must be received by the above deadlines. ! Deadline to file a disaffiliation is March 31st. ! You must disaffiliate at least 90 days before you file your Declaration of Candidacy. Secretary of State Nellie M. Gorbea | 7 ! Declarations of Candidacy must contain original signatures. Your completed form cannot be faxed or emailed. ! Your Declaration of Candidacy must be filed on June 27th, 28th or 29th. Filing a Declaration of Candidacy Declaration of Candidacy: The Declaration of Candidacy is the document you sign to start the proce ss of becoming a candidate. You “declare” yourself as a candidate for a particular office and if you wish to run as a party candidate, you also “declare” yourself to be a member of that party. Do I need to file a Declaration of Candidacy to run for office? Yes. All candidates for all public and party offices must file a Declaration of Candidacy. Where do I get a Declaration of Candidacy form? The Declaration of Candidacy form is available on our website at www.sos.ri.gov/elections/. The Declaration of Candidacy form is also available at: › Department of State’s Elections Division. See address on page 21. › Local Board of Canvassers in each city and town. See addresses on p age 20. How do I file my Declaration of Candidacy form? Complete the form online and print it out. You must then sign it and have your signature witnessed by two individuals. Deliver or mail the form. Where do I file my Declaration of Candidacy form? Candidates for: File your Declaration of Candidacy at: Federal Public Office: Independent Presidential Electors Representative in Congress Department of State’s Elections Division, 148 W. River Street, Providence, RI. State Public Office: Senator in General Assembly Representative in General Assembly Local Board of Canvassers in the city or town where you are registered to vote. * Local Public Office: Mayor/Town Administrator Council School Committee Local Board of Canvassers in the city or town where you are registered to vote. State Party Committee Office: Senatorial District Committee Representative District Committee Local Board of Canvassers in the city or town where you are registered to vote. Local Party Committee Office: City/Town/Ward Committee Local Board of Canvassers in the city or town where you are registered to vote. * Contact your local Board of Canvassers for a full listing of local public offices in your city/town. Rhode Island How to Run for Office Guide – 2016 | 8 Can I file a Declaration of Candidacy form for more than one office? You cannot file a Declaration of Candidacy for more than one public , state or local office in a primary or election. However, if you file for a state or local public office, you can still file for state or local party offices. Party offices are offices elected in a primary. You must file a separate Declaration of Candidacy for every office you seek. Example: You may file a Declaration of Candidacy as a Democrat for representative in General Assembly and another Declaration of Candidacy as a Democrat for Democratic representative dis trict committee. Additionally, you may NOT file for the same office under different party labels. Example: You may NOT file a Declaration of Candidacy for senator in General Assembly as a Democrat and file a Declaration of Candidacy for senator in General Assembly as an independent/unaffiliated candidate. If I am an independent/unaffiliated voter, and file a Declaration of Candidacy as a party candidate, does that automatically make me a member of that party? Yes. Example: If you are an independent/unaffiliated voter and file a Declaration of Candidacy as a Democrat, you are automatically recorded as a member of the Democrat Party. Filing a Declaration of Candidacy is sufficient to bind you to that party even if you do not circulate nomination papers or you do not vote in the primary . ! If a voter files a Declaration of Candidacy for more than one state or local public office during the declaration period, the last declaration filed shall negate any previous filings. Secretary of State Nellie M. Gorbea | 9 Endorsements What is an endorsement? This is the process whereby party officials designate a person to be the candidate representing their party in a primary, and if no primary, in the general election. Who makes the endorsements and where are they filed? It depends on the office for which you are running. The following chart should help: For the office of: Endorsement by: Endorsements are filed at: Required signatures Deadline to be filed Representative in Congress State Committee Department of State’s Elections Division See RIGL 17-12-4 Not later than July 1st Senator in General Assembly* Senatorial District Committee Local Board of Canvassers where candidate resides A majority of the members of the committee Not later than June 30th Senatorial District Committee* Senatorial District Committee Local Board of Canvassers where endorsed Senate candidate resides A majority of the members of the committee Not later than June 30th Representative in General Assembly* Representative District Committee Local Board of Canvassers where candidate resides A majority of the members of the committee Not later than June 30th Representative District Committee* Representative District Committee Local Board of Canvassers where endorsed Representative candidate resides A majority of the members of the committee Not later than June 30th Local Offices City/Town/Ward Committee City/Town/Ward Committee Local Board of Canvassers Three officers of the committee Not later than June 30th i * For Providence only: Endorsements of candidates for senator in General Assembly, representative in General Assembly, and senatorial or representative district committee in the city of Providence must be filed at the Department of State’s Elections Division, 148 W. River Street, Providence, RI. Rhode Island How to Run for Office Guide – 2016 | 10 What happens if I am the endorsed candidate for a public office? If you are the endorsed candidate for a public office such as senator in General Assembly or town council, you will be issued nomination papers and you must submit the required number of v alid signatures in order to qualify to be on the ballot. What happens if I am the endorsed candidate for a party office? If you are the endorsed candidate for a party office such as representative district committee or town committee, you do not need to gather signatures. The filing of the endorsement by the particular committee is sufficient to nominate you to the party office. What happens if I am unendorsed as a party candidate for public office? If you are an unendorsed candidate for a public office such as senator in General Assembly or town council, you will be issued nomination papers and you must submit the required number of valid signatures in order to qualify to be on the ballot. What happens if I am unendorsed as a party candidate for a party committee office? If you are an unendorsed candidate for a party office such as representative district committee or town committee, you will be issued nomination papers and you must submit the required nu mber of valid signatures in order to qualify to be on the ballot. Secretary of State Nellie M. Gorbea | 11 Nomination Papers What are nomination papers? Nomination papers are the forms on which you will obtain valid signature s, that is, signatures of registered voters who are eligible to vote for the office that you are seeking. In order to be on the ballot, you will need to obtain a specified number of valid signatures on your nomination papers. Who needs nomination papers? All candidates for federal, state and local public office need nomination papers. The only candidates who do NOT need nomination papers are ENDORSED candidates for party offices (i.e. district, city, town or ward committees). However, UNENDORSED candidates for district, city, town or ward committees MUST gather signatures on nomination papers. How many signatures are required on nomination papers in order to qualify? If you are running for: Number of valid signatures required: Independent Presidential Electors Representative in Congress 1,000 500 Senator in General Assembly Representative in General Assembly Senate and Representative District Committees (Unendorsed only) 100 50 50 Local Offices Check with your local Board of Canvassers. When and where do I pick up my nomination papers? You may pick up your nomination papers on July 6th. Independent presidential electors and candidates for Representative in C ongress: You must obtain your nomination papers from the Department of State’s Elections Division, 148 W. River Street, Providence, RI. All other offices (senator in General Assembly, representative in General Assembly, party offices and local offices) You must obtain your nomination papers from the local Board of Canvassers where you filed your Declaration of Candidacy, except for Providence. For Providence Candidates Only: If you are a candidate for senator in General Assembly, representative in General Assembly or senatorial or representative district committee in the city of Providence, you must obtain your nomination papers from the Department of State’s Elections Division, 148 W. River Street, Providence, RI. ! All persons other than candidates picking up nomination papers from the Department of State’s Elections Division must have written authorization from the candidate. Rhode Island How to Run for Office Guide – 2016 | 12 Who can sign my nomination papers and do they have to be a member of the same party? ANY registered voter who is eligible to vote for the office for which you seek election. Example: A voter who is registered in the First Congressional District can sign yo ur nomination papers if you are running for the office of Representative in Congress in District 1, but that voter cannot sign your nomination papers if you are running for the office of Representative in Congress in District 2. The voter DOES NOT need to be a member of the political party listed on the nomination paper. Example: A registered Democrat can sign the nomination papers of a Democratic cand idate, Moderate candidate, Republican candidate, or an independent/unaffiliated candidate. Does it make a difference which of my papers a voter signs? Yes. At the top of each nomination paper there is a space for you to indicate the city/town in which the signers are registered voters. Example: A registered voter in Providence must sign a nomination paper that lists “Providence” at the top of the paper. This is the paper that you will return to the Providence Board of Canvassers. The Providence Board of Canvassers will certify signatures on this paper. If a Cranston voter signs a Providence nomination paper, that signature will not be certified since the nomination paper will be reviewed only by the Providence Board of Canvas sers. If a voter signs a nomination paper of a party candidate, does that auto matically make the voter a member of that party? No. The act of signing nomination papers does not make the voter a member of that political party. How many papers can a person sign? There is no restriction on the number of nomination papers a person can sign for federal and state candidates. However, your signature can only be counted once for each candidate. When and where do I return my nomination papers? Nomination papers for: Must be returned by: Must be returned to: All candidates (except independent presidential electors) July 15th at 4 p.m. Local Board of Canvassers in the city or town listed at the top of the nomination paper Independent presidential electors September 9th at 4 p.m. Local Board of Canvassers in the city or town listed at the top of the nomination paper How do I know if I qualified for ballot placement? Candidates for federal, state and local office can check our website at www.sos.ri.gov/candidates. As certified nomination papers are received from the local boards of canvassers, we w ill enter the number of valid signatures for each candidate into our database. This information will be updated at the end of each day during the nomination paper certification process (July 6th through July 21st) with the final posting available on July 22nd . For independent presidential electors, information will be updated from July 6th to September 15th. ! Signers on a nomination paper must be from the city or town listed at th e top of the nomination paper. Secretary of State Nellie M. Gorbea | 13 Withdrawal of Candidacy If I file a Declaration of Candidacy, can I decide not to run? Yes, but you must file a withdrawal of candidacy. When do I file a withdrawal of candidacy? If you filed as a: File a withdrawal by: File a withdrawal with: Party or independent/unaffiliated candidate for local office Not later than July 18th Local Board of Canvassers where you filed your Declaration of Candidacy Party nominee or independent/unaffiliated candidate for federal or state office Not later than July 22nd Department of State’s Elections Division Independent presidential elector Not later than September 16th Department of State’s Elections Division Can I withdraw if I am the party’s nominee for the office that I am seeking? Yes. If you are the party’s nominee for the office that you are seeking (i.e. you are the candidate that will appear on the November ballot for your party) you can withdraw. Keep in mind that you have to withdraw by September 16th in order for the party to name another candidate to fill the vacancy. Rhode Island How to Run for Office Guide – 2016 | 14 Ballot Arrangement – Primary Will there be a primary for the office that I am seeking? A primary is necessary when two or more individuals from the same politic al party qualify for ballot placement for the same office. There will be no primary for the office you seek if: (1) no one else filed a valid Declaration of Candidacy as a party candidate from the same party for the same office that you are seeking; (2) no one else filed timely nomination papers containing the requisite number of signatures for the same office that you are seeking under the same political party; or (3) the other candidate(s) who qualified for the same office under the same political party withdrew according to state law. In primaries where the voter casts a vote for more than one candidate for an office, there is no primary when the number of candidates qualified for ballot placement equals or is less than the number to be elected. Example: In a town council race where the voters are allowed to vote for any five candidates, there is no primary when the number of candidates from the same political party qualified for ballot placement is five or less. If I run as a candidate for public office, when does my name appear on the primary ballot? Names of federal, state and local candidates for public office where there is a primary appear on the September 13th primary ballot. Please note that the names of unopposed party candidates for federal and state office also appear on the primary ballot. However, when there is no primary opposition for the office you are seeking, you are automatically the nominee of your party for said public office and your name will also appear on the November ballot. Names of unopposed party candidates for local office do not appear on the primary ballot. If I run as a candidate for a party office, when does my name appear on the ballot? Party offices are elected at the time of the primary being held for the party. For example, senatorial and representative district committees will be elected on September 13th. In elections for party offices where the voter casts a vote for more than one candidate for an office (i.e. vote for any five members of a senatorial district committee), there is no election when the number of candidates qualified for ballot placement equals or is less than the number to be elected. In this case, party office candidates are automatically elected to the positions and their names do not appear on the ballot. Secretary of State Nellie M. Gorbea | 15 How will my name appear on the primary ballot? Your name will be printed on the ballot as it appears on the voting list. How is my ballot placement determined if I am a candidate in a primary? The endorsed candidate for each federal, state and local office will appear first directly under the title of office that is being sought and will have an asterisk (*) preceding his or her name. For local offices where there is more than one endorsed candidate, the names of the endorsed candidates shall be li sted in the order in which they were certified to the Department of State’s Elections Division by the local Board of Canvassers. The unendorsed candidate or candidates for federal and state offices will follow on the ballot. If there is more than one unendorsed candidate, they will be listed on the ballot in the order chosen by a lottery conducted by the Department of State. The unendorsed candidate or candidates for local offices will be listed in alphabetical order following the name or names of the endorsed candidate or candidates. When are the lotteries conducted for ballot placement for the primary? The Department of State will conduct a lottery on July 22nd at 5 p.m., in the Governor’s State Room, State House, to determine ballot placement for unendorsed federal and state pa rty candidates for primary ballots. Ballot Arrangement – General Election How will my name appear on the general election ballot? Your name will be printed on the ballot as it appears on the voting list. Party candidates will be listed on the ballot along with the name of their political party. Independent/unaffiliated candidates will be listed on the ballot along with the name of their “political principle, movement or organization ” in small print or the word “Independent” when no “political principle, movement or organization” is listed on the candidate’s Declaration of Candidacy. How is my ballot placement determined if I am a candidate in the general election? The order in which the political parties appear on the general election ballot is determined by a lottery conducted by the Department of State. The order in which federal and state independent/unaffiliated candidates appear on the ballot beneath the party candidates is also determined by a lottery conducted by the Department of State. For local public offices the city/town selects the method of ballot placement. When are the lotteries conducted for ballot placement for the general election? The Department of State will conduct a lottery on July 22nd at 5 p.m. in the Governor’s State Room, State House, to determine ballot placement of party candidates and federal and state independent/unaffiliated candidates (except independent presidential electors) for the general election ballots. The Department of State will conduct a lottery on September 16th at 5 p.m . in the State Library, State House, to determine ballot placement of independent presidential candidates for th e general election ballots. Rhode Island How to Run for Office Guide – 2016 | 16 Election Day Activities Are there any restrictions on activities at the polling places on Election Day? Rhode Island General Laws, Section 17-19-49 currently prohibits the disp lay or distribution of any poster, paper, circular or document that would aid, injure or defeat any candidate for public office or any political party or any question on the ballot. This law prohibits such display within the voting place or within fifty (50) feet of the entrance or entrances to the building in which voting is taking place at any primary or election. Election officials, that is, wardens, moderators, clerks and bi-partisan supervisors, assigned to a polling place are also prohibited from displaying or wearing any political party butto n, badge or other device that is intended to aid, injure or defeat the candidacy of any person for public office or any question on the ballot or to intimidate or influence any voter. The State Board of Elections has oversight of the conduct of elections at polling places and that office should be contacted if you have any specific questions as to what campaigning is allowed. Their contact information can be found on page 21. Campaign Finance For state and local candidates, Title 17, Chapter 25 of the Rhode Island General Laws entitled “Rhode Island Campaign Contributions and Expenditures Reporting” governs campaign finance. The Campaign Finance Division of the State Board of Elections administer s this chapter of the Rhode Island General Laws. The State Board of Elections also promulgates rules and regulations regarding campaign finance. The Campaign Finance Division provides information relative to campaign finance reporting requirements as well as information on contribution and expenditure limits and restrictions relative to financing a campaign. The Campaign Finance Division will also provide information regarding public financing of election campaigns of candidates for statewide general offices. For further information regarding campaign finance, contact: State Board of Elections 50 Branch Avenue Providence, RI 02904 Phone: 401-222-2345 Fax: 401-222-4424 Email: [email protected] Website: www.elections.ri.gov Federal candidates running for office in Rhode Island should contact the Federal Election Commission for campaign finance requirements. Federal Election Commission Phone: 1-800-424-9530 Website: www.fec.gov Secretary of State Nellie M. Gorbea | 17 2016 Campaign Finance Calendar Note: “NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION” Any candidate for public office, as defined in §17-25-3, is required to file a “Notice of Organization” with the State Board of Elections prior to receiving any contributions or expending any money in the furtherance or aid of his/ her candidacy or at the time of filing his/her Declaration of Candidacy, whichever occurs first. (Note: Persons who have a “Notice” on file with the State Board of Elections and who regularly file reports with the Board are required to file an amended “Notice” whenever there is a change to information therein contained.) For further information regarding campaign finance requirements, contact: State Board of Elections 50 Branch Avenue Providence, Rhode Island 02904 Phone: 401-222-2345 – Fax: 401-222-4424 Email: [email protected] – Website: www.elections.ri.gov February 1 (not later than) POLITICAL PARTY COMMITTEES – TREASURER Designation of a campaign treasurer by each state and municipal committe e of a political party. [§17-25-9] March 1 ANNUAL REPORTS Each state and municipal committee of a political party must file an annual report setting forth in the aggregate all contributions received and expenditur es made during the previous calendar year. [§17-25-7(b)] May 2 (For reporting period January 1, 2016 thru March 31, 2016) QUARTERLY ONGOING REPORTS Reports are due from candidates, political parties, and political action committees. [§17-25-11] August 1 (For reporting period April 1, 2016 thru June 30, 2016) QUARTERLY ONGOING REPORTS Reports are due from candidates*, political parties, and political actio n committees. * Candidates who file their “Notice of Organization” during the declaration period need not file this report. The first report of contributions received and expenditures incurred shall be due as follows: › IF A CANDIDATE IN THE PRIMARY, the report for the period between the date of declaration and August 15, 2016, shall be due on August 16, 2016. › IF NOT A CANDIDATE IN THE PRIMARY, the report for the period between the date of declaration and October 10, 2016, shall be due on October 11, 2016. [§17-25-11] August 16 (For reporting period July 1, 2016 thru August 15, 2016) PRE-PRIMARY REPORTS Candidates, political parties, and political action committees that are participating in a primary must file reports 28 days prior to the party primaries. [§17-25-11(a)(2)] Rhode Island How to Run for Office Guide – 2016 | 18 September 6 (For reporting period August 16, 2016 thru September 5, 2016) PRE-PRIMARY REPORTS Candidates, political parties, and political action committees that are participating in a primary must file reports 7 days prior to the party primaries. [§17-25-1 1(a)(2)] October 11 PRE-ELECTION REPORTS Candidates, political parties, and political action committees that are participating in the election must file reports 28 days prior to the election. If the candidate, political party or political action committee: › PARTICIPATED IN THE PRIMARY (Does not include unsuccessful primary candidates – See October 11, 2016) the reporting period is September 6, 2016 thru October 10, 2016. › DID NOT PARTICIPATE IN THE PRIMARY the reporting period is July 1, 2016 thru October 10, 2016. [§17-25-11(a)(2)] October 11 (For reporting period September 6, 2016 thru October 10, 2016) POST-PRIMARY REPORTS – UNSUCCESSFUL PRIMARY CANDIDATES All unsuccessful primary candidates must file reports 28 days after the primary . [§17-25-11(a)(3)] October 31 (For reporting period July 1, 2016 thru September 30, 2016) QUARTERLY ONGOING REPORTS Reports are due from candidates, political parties and political action committees that are not participating in the September primary or November election . [§17-25-11] November 1 (For reporting period October 11, 2016 thru October 31, 2016) PRE-ELECTION REPORTS Candidates, political parties, and political action committees that are participating in the election must file reports 7 days prior to the election. [§17-25-11(a)(2)] December 6 (For reporting period November 1, 2016 thru December 5, 2016) POST-ELECTION REPORTS Candidates, political parties, and political action committees that part icipated in the election must file reports 28 days after the election. [§17-25-1 1(a)(3)] January 31, 2017 QUARTERLY ONGOING REPORTS Reports are due from all candidates, political parties, and political ac tion committees. If the candidate, political party or political action committee: › PARTICIPATED IN THE NOVEMBER 8, 2016 ELECTION the reporting period is December 6, 2016 thru December 31, 2016. › WAS UNSUCCESSFUL IN THE PRIMARY the reporting period is October 11, 2016 thru December 31, 2016. › DID NOT PARTICIPATE IN A PRIMARY OR ELECTION the reporting period is October 1, 2016 thru December 31, 2016. [§17-25-11] Secretary of State Nellie M. Gorbea | 19 Ethics Commission Filing All candidates for state or municipal elected office are REQUIRED to file a financial disclosure statement with the Rhode Island Ethics Commission, covering the prior calendar year. See R.I.G.L. § 36-14-16(c). This disclosure must be filed within thirty (30) days of the deadline for filing a Declaration of Candidacy . You may request an extension of time to file of no more than fifteen (15) days past the deadline, provided that you make the request to the Ethics Commission prior to the original filing deadline. The Ethics Commission’s financial disclosure form for candidates is different than, and in addition to, any campaign or candidate-related filings you may be required to make with the State Board of Elections, the Department of State, or your local Board of Canvassers. Failure to file this form on time with the Ethics Commission is a violation of the law, and will lead to the imposition of a substantial fine. The financial disclosure form requires the disclosure of, among other things, sources of income and assets, including those of a spouse and any dependent children. You generally do NOT have to disclose the amount of income you received or the value of your assets, although candidates for statewide general office do disclose ranges of income amounts. Candidates must also disclose business interes ts including those in entities that are regulated by, or do business with, the State of Rhode Island. Additionally, candidates must disclose the name and address of any person, business or organization (other than a credi t card company or the holder of your residential mortgage) which is owed more than $1,000 by the candidate, a spouse or dependent child. How to File Online: Forms may be completed and submitted online at www.ethics.ri.gov/. We strongly recommend online filing because it is simpler and faster than submitting a hard copy, and we will automatically email you a receipt and copy of your completed online form. To file online the first time you must contact the Ethics Commission (401- 222-3790) to obtain a PIN# and I.D. Hard Copy: If you do not wish to file online, you may obtain a hard copy of the financial disclosure form and file it via regular mail or hand delivery to the Ethics Commission office. To obtain a copy of the form contact the Ethics Commission. Rhode Island Ethics Commission 40 Fountain Street Providence, RI 02903 Email: [email protected] Website: www.ethics.ri.gov Phone: 401-222-3790 Rhode Island How to Run for Office Guide – 2016 | 20 Local Boards of Canvassers Contact Information Barrington Town Hall 283 County Rd. 02806 247-1900 x4 Bristol Town Hall 10 Court St. 02809 253-7000 Burrillville Town Hall 105 Harrisville Main St. Harrisville 02830 568-4300 Central Falls City Hall 580 Broad St. 02863 727-7450 Charlestown Town Hall 4540 South County Trl. 02813 364-1200 Coventry Town Hall 1670 Flat River Rd. 02816 822-9150 Cranston City Hall 869 Park Ave. 02910 780-3126 Cumberland Town Hall 45 Broad St. 02864 728-2400 East Greenwich Town Hall 125 Main St. P.O. Box 111 02818 886-8603 East Providence City Hall 145 Taunton Ave. 02914 435-7502 Exeter Town Hall 675 Ten Rod Rd. 02822 294-2287 Foster Town Hall 181 Howard Hill Rd. 02825 392-9201 Glocester Town Hall 1145 Putnam Pike P.O. Drawer B, Chepachet 02814 568-6206 x0 Hopkinton Town Hall 1 Town House Rd. 02833 377-7777 Jamestown Town Hall 93 Narragansett Ave. 02835 423-9804 Johnston Town Hall 1385 Hartford Ave. 02919 553-8856 Lincoln Town Hall 100 Old River Rd. P.O. Box 100 02865 333-1140 Little Compton Town Hall 40 Commons P.O. Box 226 02837 635-4400 Middletown Town Hall 350 East Main Rd. 02842 849-5540 Narragansett Town Hall 25 Fifth Ave. 02882 782-0625 Newport City Hall 43 Broadway 02840 845-5386 New Shoreham Town Hall 16 Old Town Rd. P.O. Box 220 02807 466-3200 North Kingstown Town Hall 80 Boston Neck Rd. 02852 294-3331 x128 North Providence Town Hall 2000 Smith St. 02911 232-0900 x234 North Smithfield Municipal Annex 575 Smithfield Rd. 02896 767-2200 Pawtucket City Hall 137 Roosevelt Ave. 02860 722-1637 Portsmouth Town Hall 2200 East Main Rd. 02871 683-3157 Providence City Hall 25 Dorrance St. 02903 421-0495 Richmond Town Hall 5 Richmond Townhouse Rd. Wyoming 02898 539-9000 x9 Scituate Town Hall 195 Danielson Pike P.O. Box 328, N. Scituate 02857 647-7466 Smithfield Town Hall 64 Farnum Pike Esmond 02917 233-1000 x112 South Kingstown Town Hall 180 High St. Wakefield 02879 789-9331 x1231 Tiverton Town Hall 343 Highland Rd. 02878 625-6703 Warren Town Hall 514 Main St. 02885 245-7340 x4 Warwick City Hall 3275 Post Rd. 02886 738-2000 West Greenwich Town Hall 280 Victory Hwy. 02817 392-3800 West Warwick Town Hall 1170 Main St. 02893 822-9201 Westerly Town Hall 45 Broad St. 02891 348-2503 Woonsocket City Hall 169 Main St. P.O. Box B 02895 767-9223 Secretary of State Nellie M. Gorbea | 21 State Elections a nd Political Party Offices Contact Information › Department of State Elections Division 148 W. River St., Providence, RI 02904 401-222-2340 › State Board of Elections 50 Branch Ave., Providence, RI 02904 401-222-2345 › Rhode Island Democratic Party 200 Metro Center Blvd., Suite 1, Warwick, RI 02886 401-272-3367 › Moderate Party of Rhode Island 209 Yorktown Rd., North Kingstown, RI 02852 401-932-8364 › Rhode Island Republican Party 1800 Post Rd., Suite 17-I, Warwick, RI 02886 401-732-8282 United States Postal Service (USPS) Contact Information The United States Postal Service provides extensive information to assis t you with your political campaign mail on its website (www.usps.com/business/political-mail.htm). For mailpiece design assistance please contact the MDA Customer Service Help Desk at (855)-593-6093 or by email at [email protected] ov. Department of State’s Website The following information concerning the 2016 election cycle will be found at: www.sos.ri.gov/elections › How to Register and Vote Guide – English & Spanish – Available soon › Declaration of Candidacy Form – Available soon › Political Party Endorsement Form – Available soon › Qualified Federal and State Candidates: Starting June 28, 2016, daily updates of federal and state candidates who filed and/or qualified for ballot placement › Qualified Local Candidates: Starting June 28, 2016, daily updates of local candidates who filed and/or qualified for ballot placement › Sample ballots › Find your polling place › Mail ballot applications – Available soon › Voter Referenda Handbook – Available September, 2016
You are a seasoned, Democratic political operative, with extensive experience managing state and local campaigns in Rhode Island. You are approached by wealthy, female entrepreneur with no political e
CAMPAIGN FINANCE WELCOME NEW CANDIDATES! CF – 1 NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION • Registers campaign with the BOE (must be done prior to raising or spending funds) • Provide current and reliable contact info • Designate a treasurer (a separate treasurer is required if raising/spending over $10k) • Disclose bank information (NOT BANK ACCOUNT NUMBER!) • Sign affidavit on back of form • All original signatures must be notarized! BANK REQUIREMENTS  Open a segregated bank account at a financial institution with a physical branch in the state of RI. No comingling of personal and campaign funds.  Submit a copy of your December bank statement annually (or a close -out statement if you dissolve your campaign prior to the end of the year).  All campaign activity should flow through your campaign account. REPORTING SCHEDULE  Due dates differ depending on primary candidates or general election only candidates  A report filed on paper consists of three forms: CF -2, CF -3, and CF -4  Reporting must be done online if raise/spend over $10k, or have $25k or more, and may be done by any other campaign. Call to set up a training session.  Late reports will be assessed a $25 fine (increases $2/day after certified letters sent)  Reporting schedule is quarterly in a non – election year CONTENTS OF REPORTS  Campaign Finance reports (periodic and quarterly) shall consist of: “Summary of Campaign Activity” (Form CF -2), “Schedule of Contributions Received” (Form CF -3), and “Schedule of Expenditures” (Form CF -4) Contributions Each schedule must include: • The amount contributed by each individual, PAC, or committee with: • Name, address, place of employment, and receipt date of all contributions exceeding $100 in the aggregate in a calendar year Expenditures Each schedule must include: • The amount of all expenditures with: • Name, address, date, and purpose of all expenditures that exceed $100 in the aggregate in a calendar year • Credit card expenses must be recorded in detail and list all vendors AGGREGATE CONTRIBUTIONS/EXPENDITURES  Contributions/Expenditures may be reported as an aggregate if a donor/vendor does NOT exceed $100 in a calendar year (records of donor information and vendor receipts/invoices must be maintained for a period of four years.  Any contribution/expenditure exceeding $100 MUST be itemized. If previously reported as an aggregate, prior report must be amended and transaction itemized. CONTRIBUTION LIMITS, SOURCES, & CASH ALLOWABLE  Can receive up to $1,000 in a calendar year from individual/candidate or Political Action Committee (PAC)  Can receive up to $25,000 and unlimited in -kind from state political parties PROHIBITED  Direct contributions from corporations, unions, non -profit organizations, or any business entity  The personal use of campaign funds  Contributions over $25 in cash from a single source in the aggregate in a calendar year  Contributions from other than an individual, PAC, or a political party  Anonymous Contributions IN – KIND CONTRIBUTIONS  Non -monetary contribution received from a donor  Examples: Food at a fundraiser or ad in the newspaper  Contribution must have a fair market value (receipt/invoice provided by donor) and cannot be a special deal/discount (price available to general public).  Amount of in -kind contribution is inclusive of $1,000 individual maximum in a calendar year. CF – 5 AFFIDAVIT FOR ANNUAL FILING EXEMPTION  For smaller campaigns  Exempts candidate from all reports except annual summary due January 31  Parameters:  Cannot spend more than $1,000 in a calendar year  Cannot accept more than $100 per source (including loans and in -kind) in a calendar year  Must be filed annually CF – 7 AFFIDAVIT DISSOLVING CAMPAIGN ACCOUNT  Campaign account is still active until CF -7 is completed.  Must have cash balance of zero to close out  Remaining funds can be dispersed in the following ways: o Repayment of Loan (if any exist) o Donate to candidate/PAC/party committee (subject to limitations) o Donate to a non -profit (candidate cannot receive any benefit) o Return contributions to donors o Forfeit to State of RI CF – 9 ACCOUNT CERTIFICATION  Required only if candidate exceeds $10,000 raised or $10,000 spent in a calendar year  If $10,000 threshold met, candidate must designate a separate treasurer  Treasurer completes CF -9 and submits with each report (certifying the accuracy of its contents)  $10,000 threshold resets as of January 1 Closing Remarks  Please do not rely on information you have heard from others. Go straight to the source! Call, email us, or visit our website! • 401 -222 -2345 • [email protected] • www.elections.ri.gov  We send out letters and emails periodically. Please be certain to keep updated contact information. Submit a new CF -1 for any changes. THANK YOU & GOOD LUCK!
You are a seasoned, Democratic political operative, with extensive experience managing state and local campaigns in Rhode Island. You are approached by wealthy, female entrepreneur with no political e
1 Campaign Strategy Memo Outline Introduction I. I am writing to you concerning the upcoming campaigns. II. The target populations for the campaign are the youth and women III. Address and location of the target populations will be given after training ends. Background I. The memo is to help campaign teams to understand the strategies set. II. The budget for the campaign is 20,200 dollars. III. The major strategy the campaign will use is digital market ing. Purpose of the Memo I. Major Strategy techniques should be proven and tested before use. II. The Mission and vision of the campaign should be easy to understand. III. Strengths and Weakness of the campaigns should be well evaluated. IV. Obstacles limiting achievement of major goals should receive attention. V. Conclusions regarding the success of the campaign should be provided to teams. Assessment of Strategies I. Analyze different scenarios for success of the campaign. II. Evaluate and revise the goals of the campaign. III. Techniques to execute should be within budget. IV. Leadership positions in the campaigns is vital. Transformation Leaders at the campaign. 2 I. Enthusiasm is high in a transformation leadership to use in the campaign. II. Effective management of change in th e campaigns. III. The turnover costs will greatly reduce. IV. The team will remain united behind a common cause. Recommendations for success of the campaigns I. Create tailored -content for the audience. II. The campaign should operate within the set budget. III. Plan proper d istribution of teams throughout the targeted region.

Writerbay.net

Everyone needs a little help with academic work from time to time. Hire the best essay writing professionals working for us today!

Get a 15% discount for your first order


Order a Similar Paper Order a Different Paper